Topic: Parity / Invariants

Search
Activity Authors
Activity Circles
Click To Sort By
Grade
Audience
  • 1st - 2nd (3)
  • 3rd - 5th (11)
  • 6th - 8th (26)
  • 9th - 12th (28)
  • College Level (27)
  • For Teachers (27)
Topics
Topics
  • Algebra / Arithmetic (8)
  • Combinatorics (32)
  • Geometry (11)
  • Mathematical Games (9)
  • Mathematical Modeling (2)
  • Number Theory (6)
  • Parity / Invariants (1)
  • Problem Solving / General (14)
  • Probability and Statistics (2)
Supporting Materials
Supporting Materials
  • Facilitator Guides (30)
  • Handouts (10)
  • Lesson Plan (2)
  • Photos & Videos (10)
  • References (14)
  • Virtual Tools (5)
Session Styles
Session Styles
  • Integrates Technology (4)
  • Kinesthetic Element (2)
  • Manipulatives (11)
  • Multiple Representations (10)
  • Problem Posing (13)
  • Problem Sets (15)
  • Try a Smaller Problem (20)
  • Work Backwards (7)
Mathematical Practices
Mathematical Practices
  • MP1 - Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them. (29)
  • MP2 - Reason abstractly and quantitatively. (17)
  • MP3 - Construct viable arguments and critique others' reasoning. (20)
  • MP4 - Model with mathematics. (18)
  • MP5 - Use appropriate tools strategically. (13)
  • MP6 - Attend to precision. (11)
  • MP7 - Look for and make use of structure. (28)
  • MP8 - Look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning. (19)

Mathematical Magic for Muggles

By:


Presented are several easy-to-perform feats that suggest supernatural powers such as telepathy, “seeing fingers,” predicting the future, photographic memory, etc. Each trick uses simple mathematical ideas that allow information to flow effortlessly and sneakily, among them simple, efficient “coding” parity and other invariants symmetry probability One can approach these activities in many ways. At first, you may want to figure out HOW to do a trick. Then, you want to know WHY it works. Finally, you should strive to understand REALLY WHY it works: is there a simple theme or principle behind your possibly complex explanation? Look for simple and...

Pigeonhole Principle and Parity Problems

By:


The pigeonhole principle states that if n pigeons are put into m cubbies, with n > m, then at least one cubby must contain more than one pigeon. Parity problems deal with odd and even integers. Here is a collection of problems that can be used in a single problem solving session, or as individual teaser questions.

Problems are suitable for a math circle or classroom.